Home Health Care Agencies Face Nurse Shortage

An accomplished pharmaceutical executive with more than 20 years of industry experience, John Klein serves as the chairman of the Alpine, NJ-based Cambridge Therapeutics. In addition to his responsibilities at Cambridge Therapeutics, John Klein actively follows health-related news affecting NJ.

Home healthcare agencies in NJ recently warned of a future shortage of private duty nurses (PDNs) in the state. Pointing to lower-than-desired Medicaid reimbursement rates, agency representative said that they are experiencing difficulties recruiting qualified nurses for home-based services. PDNs provide around-the-clock care for medically complex patients in their homes, sometimes tending to individuals who are cognitively impaired or born with congenital defects.

Licensed as either a registered nurse or a licensed practical nurse, PDNs are paid through Medicaid reimbursements, making it hard for them to earn as much as their hospital-based counterparts. More than a decade has passed since the last Medicaid-reimbursement increase.

According to an internal study by BAYADA Home Health Care, the home healthcare industry attracts only 17 percent of registered nurses and 40 percent of licensed practical nurses, leaving many patients without the nursing care they need.

Bergen New Bridge and Horizon BCBS Announce Partnership

The recipient of a master of business administration from Roosevelt University, John Klein serves as the chairman of Cambridge Therapeutics in Alpine, NJ. In addition to guiding Cambridge Therapeutics’ strategic direction, John Klein closely follows health-related developments in NJ.

Recently, the state’s largest hospital, Bergen New Bridge Medical Center, and NJ’s biggest insurance company, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield (Horizon BCBS), announced the formation of a new partnership. In July 2019, NJ Governor Phil Murphy joined representatives from Bergen New Bridge, Horizon BCBS, and Bergen County to celebrate the alliance, which is expected to increase access to multiple healthcare services for local residents.

The new agreement will enable Bergen New Bridge to accept insurance for approximately 230,000 Horizon BCBS members in Bergen County and others whose plans were previously denied. Governor Murphy praised the cooperation, stating that expanding access to the addiction-rehabilitation program and other means of aid at the hospital will help fill treatment gaps in the state.

NJ Announces Program to Fund MAT Training for Medical Professionals

An alumnus of Roosevelt University with a BS and an MBA, John Klein serves as the chairman of Cambridge Therapeutics in Alpine, NJ. Aside from providing experienced leadership to Cambridge Therapeutics, John Klein closely follows developments in NJ health policy.

To fight the opioid addiction crisis, New Jersey recently introduced a program that will train hundreds of additional health care professionals in medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Considered the best treatment approach for opioid addiction, MAT combines outpatient counseling and treatment services with medication, usually buprenorphine, which works to block cravings and the high associated with heroin and other opioid use.

In partnership with medical schools in Camden and Newark, the NJ Department of Human Services will help physicians, advanced practice nurses, and physician assistants obtain the required training and federal certification to administer MAT to patients, allocating $2 million in funding. The New Jersey State Nurses Association and the Medical Society of New Jersey praised the state’s initiative to combat the opioid epidemic and increase capacity for addiction treatment in NJ.

New Jersey Department of Health to Improve Long-Term Care